I know that you’ve probably already been reading about the Philippines recent International rankings falling short in the area of public accountability, transparency and judicial processes in the government. And I know you’ve read many of my blogs pertaining to this many different subjects showing the Philippines fast deteriorating condition both moral, economic and political; sadly, the future looks bleak for the Filipino people if we continue down this route. Of course, I’m not begging for your understanding nor do I seek to misinform your senses. I am only in the side of truth. Though, right now — our authorities may try to shove down our throats their own version of ”truths” as convenient as they’d easily befit themselves as fact-worthy given that they are the perceived ”authorities” but we must adhere to basic common-sense and common patriotic stand that is ‘Pro People’ and not ‘Pro Politiko’. We ought to be more circumspect in criticzing our politicians to ensure that we steer them to the right path and prevent any attempts to quell public accountability and support an authoritarian one-party rule where only Duterte’s beloved supermajority takes huge chunks of the pie whilst plundering with their heart’s content; the people has to bear the mounting pressures of huge-taxes and incompentent government decisions leading to hunger, inflation etc.

The Philippines worst than conflict-torn Congo, Yemen, Venezeula in the recent Global Finance Magazine Most Peaceful Countries 2019

Before we go ahead and discuss how this happened. Let’s try and appreciate the Global Finance Mag. Who are they? What they do? Why must we trust their data? First, off. Global Finance is a monthly magazine founded in 1987 by publishing entrepreneurs Joseph Giarraputo and Carl Burgen. Giarraputo continues as Publisher and Editorial Director. Its mission is to help corporate leaders, bankers and investors chart the course of global business and finance. Global Finance magazine has a circulation of 50,050, audited by BPA, and readers in 163 countries. Its headquarters are in New York, with offices in London and Milan. Global Finance’s audience includes Chairmen, Presidents, CEOs, CFOs, Treasurers and other senior financial officers responsible for making investment and strategic business decisions at multinational companies and financial institutions.

Judging by the length of Global Finance magazine’s service. Which spanned since 1987 then it’s pretty clear that many known businessmen and financial experts trust their organization and it is only right that we have to try and truly trust the amount of data coming from their study (World Safest Countries 2019) which consider the following factors such as risks of natural disaster with crime, terrorism and war to present a more rounded analysis of the world’s safest countries.

Rank

Country

Global Finance Safety Index Score

1Iceland6.16
2Switzerland7.01
3Finland7.04
4Portugal7.07
5Austria7.08
6Norway7.27
7Qatar7.28
8Singapore7.34
9Denmark7.41
10New Zealand7.42
11Canada7.42
12Slovenia7.44
13Sweden7.50
14Czech Republic7.68
15Spain7.81
16Ireland7.82
17Estonia7.89
18Australia7.95
19Belgium7.98
20Germany8.09
21United Arab Emirates8.21
22Croatia8.27
23Oman8.34
24Latvia8.45
25Lithuania8.49
26Slovakia8.53
27Poland8.54
28Hungary8.61
29Mongolia8.74
30Bhutan8.79
31Netherland8.82
32Cyprus8.88
33Romania8.88
34South Korea8.93
35Uruguay8.93
36France9.01
37Kuwait9.10
38United Kingdom9.21
39Malaysia9.22
40Italy9.23
41Botswana9.25
42Bulgaria9.27
43Japan9.49
44Kazakhstan9.50
45Morocco9.53
46Moldova9.58
47Laos9.61
48Jordan9.67
49Georgia9.68
50Argentina9.80
51Rwanda9.98
52Zambia9.98
53Nambia10.00
54Saudi Arabia10.02
55Bahrain10.02
56Bosnia and Herzegovina10.04
57Greece10.13
58Serbia10.14
59Macedonia10.24
60Paraguay10.25
61Chile10.25
62Armenia10.25
63Ghana10.27
64Panama10.27
65United States10.30
66Malawi10.33
67Bolivia10.39
68Tajikistan10.48
69Albania10.48
70Sri Lanka10.53
71Azerbaijan10.56
72Gabon10.57
73Mauritius10.72
74Tunisia10.77
75Ecuador10.81
76Nepal10.82
77Iran10.84
78Lesotho10.88
79Tanzania11.02
80Senegal11.08
81China11.11
82Algreia11.14
83Vietnam11.15
84Brazil11.15
85Peru11.22
86Sierra Leone11.26
87Indonesia11.27
88Madagascar11.32
89Kyrgyzstan11.43
90Benin11.60
91Uganda11.62
92Israel11.64
93Zimbabwe11.84
94Cote d’Ivoire11.85
95Mozambique11.91
96Ethiopia12.01
97Costa Rica12.02
98Nicaragua12.06
99Trinidad and Tobago12.19
100Thailand12.27
101South Africa12.33
102Dominican Republic12.48
103Egypt12.63
104Mauritania12.76
105Mexico12.82
106India12.85
107Turkey12.94
108Russia12.94
109 Cambodia12.96
110Jamaica13.02
111Kenya13.13
112Lebanon13.43
113Burundi13.46
114Honduras13.55
115Cameroon13.56
116Ukraine13.91
117Congo13.96
118Venezuela13.98
119Mali14.15
120Chad14.31
121Bangladesh14.66
122Colombia14.79
123Pakistan14.80
124Nigeria14.88
125El Salvador15.43
126Guatemala15.81
127Yemen15.93

128

Philippines

17.70

 

What is in store for the Philippines?

The rankings itself may pose a significant drawback for potential investors which could have helped propel our clumsy economy forward. However, Duterte is far more interested in strenghtening his hand on Philippine politics by giving much of the branches of the government towards his favored loyalists. We could for example foresee ‘Gloria Arroyo’ and upcoming first-daughter ‘Sara Duterte’ running for the Presidency in 2022. Whatever that means, this should not discourage us from pursuing the government in its irresponsible decisions and holding them accountable for it. Because this is exactly what a vibrant democracy should look like.

 

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